Case C-348/13, BestWater International – objecting to the embedding of videos

Where a company’s website allows a visitor to view a video that has actually been made by a rival company, can the rival rely on the EU’s InfoSoc Directive 2001/29 to stop its video from being shown?

Facts
BestWater International makes water filters. It decided to organise an advertising campaign. It made a promotional video entitled, ‘Reality’ [“Die Realität”]. The film was all about water pollution. The film was about two minutes long.

BestWater’s video appeared on YouTube; consequently, it became available on-demand. BestWater claims to have had no knowledge that its film was on YouTube.

The defendants in this case are two independent sales representatives (sales reps) of a company that is a direct competitor of BestWater. Each sales rep ran his own website. The websites detailed the goods which could be bought from the sales reps. However, in the summer of 2010, visitors to the sales reps’ websites could also watch BestWater’s video.

BestWater objected to this. It sought an injunction from a German court. BestWater’s starting point was that its film was protected by copyright. BestWater owned the exclusive rights to use its film. And since it had not consented to the defendants’ use of the film, the defendants were breaching its copyright.

At the German Supreme Court
To begin with, the German Supreme Court noted that a hyperlink placed on someone’s website does not constitute an infringement of German copyright law. The reason being that it is not that person who decides whether a copyright protected works is made available to the public. Thus, the placing a hyperlink on a website will not infringe Article 19a of the German Copyright Act, which implements Article 3(1) of the EU’s InfoSoc Directive 2001/29.

Article 3 of the Directive provides:

Right of communication to the public of works and right of making available to the public other subject-matter
1. Member States shall provide authors with the exclusive right to authorise or prohibit any communication to the public of their works, by wire or wireless means, including the making available to the public of their works in such a way that members of the public may access them from a place and at a time individually chosen by them.

Despite the clarity of the German Supreme Court’s position towards hyperlinks, what was not clear was whether framing could still infringe Article 3(1) of the Directive by dint of another provision of the German Copyright Act.

Several leading commentators on copyright law had argued that framing could fall within, and be contrary to, Article 15(2) of the German Copyright Act. That provision provides a right against the ‘unknown exploitation’ of a communication to the public. And the provision is not to be read in isolation for it is connected to a range of other statutory rules dealing with, for example, a communication to the public, and broadcasting rights. Thus, as the German Supreme Court recognised, Article 15(2) of the German Copyright Act also had to be interpreted in conformity with Article 3(1) of the Directive. And Article 3(1) was a provision of full harmonisation.

The German Supreme Court summarised the CJEU’s recent case law that has interpreted Article 3(1) of the Directive. Accordingly, it observed that in light of Joined Cases C-403/08 and C-429/08, Football Association Premier League Ltd (Grand Chamber), there might be a communication to the public in the present case. Consequently the tests in Case C-135/10, SCF and Case C-162/10, PPL had to be applied on an individual basis to determine whether there was a communication to the public.

The German Supreme Court did not know whether those criteria were satisfied here. Certainly the defendants had made the links to the films on their website, and had done so knowingly. Website users were not reached accidentally. And the communication was to a public, in so far as users of the defendants’ websites reached an unlimited number of potential addressees. The communication of the films was also done for commercial reasons since it would increase the sales of the sales reps.

And yet, the defendants were not communicating the work to a new public. The film was already on YouTube and publicly available to every Internet user. Accordingly, by linking to the film, the defendants had not broadened the circle of the film’s potential addressees. The films were not communicated as a result of a specific technological process or technical conditions, that differed from the one initially used to communicate the film to the public. Namely, the film was transmitted to the user via the defendants’ websites in the precisely the same way as if the users had clicked directly on what was offered on the YouTube site.

Therefore, the question arose as to whether the embedding a third-party’s work that was publicly available on another third-party’s website constituted a communication to the public where there was no new public, and the technological process was the same. (The German Supreme Court mentioned in this context the questions of Sweden’s Svea hovrätt in Case C-466/12, Svensson).

The German Supreme Court was minded to answer its question in the affirmative. According to German case law, the placing of a hyperlink did not constitute a communication to the public in the form of making copyright protected work publicly available. The person who places the link does not commit a copyright-relevant act. He merely refers the user to the work in a way which facilitates the user access to what is already publicly available. He does not make the protected work available on demand, nor intervenes in it. It is the person who places the work on the Internet, who decides whether the work remains publicly available.

However, German law is different when it comes to a hyperlink placed on a website which is in the form of a deeplink that circumvents a technological protection mechanism. In that scenario, the German Supreme Court had already held that a right holder is only making the protected-work available to specific users, and is only making the work available in that limited way. Consequently, a hyperlink as a deeplink opens up access to a work; hence it infringes the communication to the public right, in its form of the making available right.

The German Supreme Court went on to explain the distinct scenario in the present case. Namely, a person who, via framing, makes available a third-party’s protected-work which is available on another third-party’s website. The copyright-protected work forms an integral part of the person’s website. Framing does not facilitate the user accessing the initial website that contained the protected work – instead, it is much more the case that the person who embeds the material into his website appropriates it. He avoids the storing and preparing of the work – which would need the consent of the right holder. Such a situation is, in the view of the German Supreme Court, relevant to viewing it as a communication to the public, as defined in Article 3(1) of the Directive. The key point is that the person who embeds the protected-work in his website appropriates it.

Question Referred
An unofficial translation of the Question asked by the German Supreme Court reads:

1. Where a third-party’s copyright-protected work is made available to the public on a third-party’s internet site, does the work’s embedding into a person’s own website, in circumstances such as those in the present case, constitute a communication to the public within the meaning of Article 3(1) of Directive 2001/29/EC, even where the work is not communicated to a new public, and the communication is not the result of a specific technological process distinct from that of the original communication?

Comment
The German Supreme Court refers to Case C-466/12, Svensson (see further, Case C-466/12, Svensson – hyperlinks and communicating works to the public).

It should be noted that there are now two more references which have been made to the CJEU on the subject of hyperlinks, namely, Case C-279/13, C More Entertainment, and Case C-360/13, Public Relations Consultants Association – which is also known in England as the Meltwater litigation. See further, Case C-279/13, C More Entertainment – skating on thin ice with embedded links in EU copyright law.

In that context, it is curious to note that the German Supreme Court in BestWater was at pains to distinguish hyperlinking from framing, all the more so since the word ‘framing’ is not mentioned in the German court’s question. The focus of the court’s question is on embedding, which is a broader term.

Can the EU law concept of a communication to the public be stretched to encompass this technological process? After all, no content is embedded or stored in the defendant’s website or the computer server running ‘behind’ it. The only thing embedded in the website and computer is a coded reference which causes the end-user’s browser to go and collect some extra information from another website, and incorporate that material when building up the page that will become visible on the end-user’s computer screen.

Update – 8 October 2013
The Svensson case is to be heard by the Fourth Chamber on 7 November 2013.

Update – 30 October 2014

Order
The French version of the CJEU’s Order in Case C-348/13, BestWater International ECLI:EU:C:2014:2315 is reproduced below. The reproduction is not authentic. Only the versions of the document published in the ‘Reports of Cases’ or the ‘Official Journal of the European Union’ are authentic. The source of the reproduction is the Eur-Lex Europa web site. The information on that site is subject to a disclaimer and a copyright notice.

ORDONNANCE DE LA COUR (neuvième chambre)

21 octobre 2014 ( )

«Renvoi préjudiciel – Rapprochement des législations – Droit d’auteur et droits voisins – Directive 2001/29/CE – Société de l’information – Harmonisation de certains aspects du droit d’auteur et des droits voisins – Article 3, paragraphe 1 – Communication au public – Notion – Liens Internet donnant accès à des œuvres protégées – Utilisation de la technique de la ‘transclusion’ (‘framing’)»

Dans l’affaire C‑348/13,

ayant pour objet une demande de décision préjudicielle au titre de l’article 267 TFUE, introduite par le Bundesgerichtshof (Allemagne), par décision du 16 mai 2013, parvenue à la Cour le 25 juin 2013, dans la procédure

BestWater International GmbH

contre

Michael Mebes,

Stefan Potsch,

LA COUR (neuvième chambre),

composée de M. J. Malenovský (rapporteur), faisant fonction de président de la neuvième chambre, M. M. Safjan et Mme A. Prechal, juges,

avocat général: Mme E. Sharpston,

greffier: M. A. Calot Escobar,

vu la décision prise, l’avocat général entendu, de statuer par voie d’ordonnance motivée, conformément à l’article 99 du règlement de procédure de la Cour,

rend la présente

Ordonnance

1        La demande de décision préjudicielle porte sur l’interprétation de l’article 3, paragraphe 1, de la directive 2001/29/CE du Parlement européen et du Conseil, du 22 mai 2001, sur l’harmonisation de certains aspects du droit d’auteur et des droits voisins dans la société de l’information (JO L 167, p. 10).

2        Cette demande a été présentée dans le cadre d’un litige opposant BestWater International GmbH (ci-après «BestWater International») à MM. Mebes et Potsch au sujet de l’insertion, sur des sites Internet gérés par ces personnes, de liens cliquables qui utilisent la technique de la «transclusion» («framing») et au moyen desquels l’internaute était dirigé vers un film sur lequel BestWater International disposait des droits exclusifs d’exploitation.

 Le cadre juridique

3        L’article 3, paragraphe 1, de la directive 2001/29 dispose:

«Les États membres prévoient pour les auteurs le droit exclusif d’autoriser ou d’interdire toute communication au public de leurs œuvres, par fil ou sans fil, y compris la mise à la disposition du public de leurs œuvres de manière que chacun puisse y avoir accès de l’endroit et au moment qu’il choisit individuellement.»

 Le litige au principal et la question préjudicielle

4        BestWater International fabrique et commercialise des systèmes de filtre à eau. Pour ses besoins publicitaires, elle a fait produire un film de deux minutes environ sur le thème de la pollution des eaux, sur lequel elle détient des droits exclusifs d’exploitation. Au moment des faits ayant donné lieu au litige au principal, ce film était consultable sur la plateforme vidéo «YouTube». Cependant, BestWater International affirme que cette mise en ligne a été réalisée sans son consentement.

5        MM. Mebes et Potsch sont des agents commerciaux indépendants qui agissent pour le compte d’une entreprise concurrente de BestWater International. Ils possèdent chacun un site Internet sur lequel ils assurent la promotion des produits commercialisés par leur cliente. Au cours de l’été 2010, MM. Mebes et Potsch ont permis aux visiteurs de leurs sites Internet de visualiser le film produit par BestWater International au moyen d’un lien Internet utilisant la technique de la «transclusion». Lorsque les utilisateurs cliquaient sur ce lien, le film, lequel provenait de la plateforme vidéo mentionnée au point précédent, apparaissait en incrustation sur les sites Internet de MM. Mebes et Potsch, donnant l’impression qu’il était montré depuis ceux-ci.

6        Considérant que MM. Mebes et Potsch avaient mis le film qu’elle avait produit à la disposition du public sans son autorisation, BestWater International a introduit une action en vue d’obtenir la cessation de sa diffusion et leur a réclamé des dommages et intérêts ainsi que le remboursement des frais de mise en demeure.

7        MM. Mebes et Potsch s’étant engagés, sous peine d’une pénalité conventionnelle, à cesser la diffusion du film, les parties ont considéré d’un commun accord que l’action en cessation était devenue sans objet. En revanche, la juridiction de première instance a fait droit aux autres chefs de demande de BestWater International en condamnant chacun des défendeurs au principal à lui verser 1 000 euros de dommages et intérêts et à lui rembourser 555,60 euros au titre des frais de mise en demeure. Cette juridiction a en outre condamné MM. Mebes et Potsch aux dépens, y compris en ce qui concerne la partie du litige devenue sans objet.

8        Saisie par MM. Mebes et Potsch, la juridiction d’appel a réformé la décision de première instance en répartissant à parts égales les dépens relatifs à la demande devenue sans objet. En revanche, elle a rejeté les autres chefs de demande de BestWater International.

9        BestWater International a introduit un recours en «Revision» devant le Bundesgerichtshof contre l’arrêt de ladite juridiction d’appel.

10      Lors de l’examen dudit recours, la juridiction de renvoi a notamment relevé, en substance, que, lorsqu’une œuvre a déjà fait l’objet d’une «communication au public», au sens de l’article 3, paragraphe 1, de la directive 2001/29, un nouvel acte de communication effectué selon le même mode technique ne peut être qualifié de «communication au public» au sens de cette disposition que si cet acte s’effectue auprès d’un public nouveau. Par conséquent, l’insertion, dans l’affaire au principal, de liens Internet par MM. Mebes et Potsch vers le film produit par BestWater International n’aurait pas eu pour effet de transmettre à un public nouveau ce film, car celui-ci était déjà librement disponible sur une plateforme vidéo. Toutefois, cette juridiction observe que les liens en cause utilisaient la technique de la «transclusion». Or, cette technique permet au gérant d’un site de s’approprier une œuvre, tout en lui évitant de devoir la copier et ainsi de tomber dans le champ d’application des dispositions relatives au droit de reproduction. Par conséquent, la juridiction de renvoi se pose la question de savoir si l’utilisation de cette technique justifierait qu’il soit néanmoins admis que l’insertion des liens en cause au principal constitue une «communication au public», au sens de l’article 3, paragraphe 1, de la directive 2001/29.

11      Dans ces conditions, le Bundesgerichtshof a décidé de surseoir à statuer et de poser à la Cour la question préjudicielle suivante:

«Le fait que l’œuvre d’un tiers mise à la disposition du public sur un site Internet soit insérée sur un autre site Internet dans des conditions telles que celles en cause au principal peut-il être qualifié de ‘communication au public’, au sens de l’article 3, paragraphe 1, de la directive 2001/29, même lorsque l’œuvre en question n’est ni transmise à un public nouveau ni communiquée suivant un mode technique spécifique différent de celui de la communication d’origine?»

 Sur la question préjudicielle

12      Conformément à l’article 99 de son règlement de procédure, lorsque la réponse à une question posée à titre préjudiciel peut être clairement déduite de la jurisprudence, la Cour peut à tout moment, sur proposition du juge rapporteur, l’avocat général entendu, décider de statuer par voie d’ordonnance motivée.

13      Il y a lieu de faire application de cette disposition dans le cadre du présent renvoi préjudiciel.

14      En effet, il ressort d’une jurisprudence constante de la Cour que, pour être qualifiée de «communication au public», au sens de l’article 3, paragraphe 1, de la directive 2001/29, une œuvre protégée doit être communiquée selon un mode technique spécifique, différent de ceux jusqu’alors utilisés ou, à défaut, auprès d’un public nouveau, c’est‑à‑dire un public n’ayant pas été déjà pris en compte par les titulaires du droit d’auteur lorsqu’ils ont autorisé la communication initiale de leur œuvre au public (voir, en ce sens, arrêt SGAE, C‑306/05, EU:C:2006:764, points 40 et 42; ordonnance Organismos Sillogikis Diacheirisis Dimiourgon Theatrikon kai Optikoakoustikon Ergon, C‑136/09, EU:C:2010:151, point 38, ainsi que arrêt ITV Broadcasting e.a., C‑607/11, EU:C:2013:147, point 39).

15      S’agissant plus spécifiquement de l’insertion sur un site Internet, par un tiers, au moyen d’un lien Internet, d’une œuvre protégée ayant été déjà librement communiquée au public sur un autre site Internet, la Cour a jugé, au point 24 de l’arrêt Svensson e.a. (C‑466/12, EU:C:2014:76), que, étant donné qu’un tel acte de communication utilise le même mode technique que celui déjà utilisé pour communiquer cette œuvre sur cet autre site Internet, pour être qualifié de «communication au public» au sens de l’article 3, paragraphe 1, de la directive 2001, cet acte doit être effectué auprès d’un public nouveau.

16      Lorsque tel n’est pas le cas, notamment, en raison du fait que l’œuvre est déjà librement disponible pour l’ensemble des internautes sur un autre site Internet avec l’autorisation des titulaires du droit d’auteur, ledit acte ne saurait être qualifié de «communication au public» au sens de l’article 3, paragraphe 1, de la directive 2001/29 (voir, en ce sens, arrêt Svensson e.a., EU:C:2014:76, points 25 à 28).

17      Aux points 29 et 30 de l’arrêt Svensson e.a. (EU:C:2014:76), la Cour a précisé que cette conclusion n’est pas remise en cause par la circonstance que, lorsque les internautes cliquent sur le lien en cause, l’œuvre protégée apparaît en donnant l’impression qu’elle est montrée depuis le site sur lequel se trouve ce lien, alors qu’elle provient en réalité d’un autre site. Or, cette circonstance est, en substance, celle qui caractérise l’utilisation, comme dans l’affaire au principal, de la technique de la «transclusion», cette dernière consistant à diviser une page d’un site Internet en plusieurs cadres et à afficher dans l’un d’eux, au moyen d’un lien Internet «incorporé» («inline linking»), un élément provenant d’un autre site afin de dissimuler aux utilisateurs de ce site l’environnement d’origine auquel appartient cet élément.

18      Certes, comme le relève la juridiction de renvoi, cette technique peut être utilisée pour mettre à la disposition du public une œuvre en évitant de devoir la copier et ainsi de tomber dans le champ d’application des dispositions relatives au droit de reproduction, mais il n’en demeure pas moins que son utilisation n’aboutit pas à ce que l’œuvre en cause soit communiquée à un public nouveau. En effet, dès lors que et tant que cette œuvre est librement disponible sur le site vers lequel pointe le lien Internet, il doit être considéré que, lorsque les titulaires du droit d’auteur ont autorisé cette communication, ceux-ci ont pris en compte l’ensemble des internautes comme public.

19      Eu égard à ce qui précède, il convient de répondre à la question posée que le seul fait qu’une œuvre protégée, librement disponible sur un site Internet, est insérée sur un autre site Internet au moyen d’un lien utilisant la technique de la «transclusion», telle que celle utilisée dans l’affaire au principal, ne peut pas être qualifié de «communication au public», au sens de l’article 3, paragraphe 1, de la directive 2001/29, dans la mesure où l’œuvre en cause n’est ni transmise à un public nouveau ni communiquée suivant un mode technique spécifique, différent de celui de la communication d’origine.

 Sur les dépens

20      La procédure revêtant, à l’égard des parties au principal, le caractère d’un incident soulevé devant la juridiction de renvoi, il appartient à celle-ci de statuer sur les dépens.

Par ces motifs, la Cour (neuvième chambre) dit pour droit:

Le seul fait qu’une œuvre protégée, librement disponible sur un site Internet, est insérée sur un autre site Internet au moyen d’un lien utilisant la technique de la «transclusion» («framing»), telle que celle utilisée dans l’affaire au principal, ne peut pas être qualifié de «communication au public», au sens de l’article 3, paragraphe 1, de la directive 2001/29/CE du Parlement européen et du Conseil, du 22 mai 2001, sur l’harmonisation de certains aspects du droit d’auteur et des droits voisins dans la société de l’information, dans la mesure où l’œuvre en cause n’est ni transmise à un public nouveau ni communiquée suivant un mode technique spécifique, différent de celui de la communication d’origine.

Signatures


Langue de procédure: l’allemand.

EU Law Radar Links to Cases Cited

EU Law Radar Links to Later Authorities

 

Update – 4 April 2015
Partly in light of aspects of the CJEU’s judgment in Case C-348/13, BestWater International, the Dutch Supreme Court has decided to make a reference to the CJEU about hyperlinking hyperleaks. For my unofficial translation of the questions asked, see the report on Case C-466/12, Svensson – hyperlinks and communicating works to the public.

Update – 15 April 2015
The Dutch Supreme Court’s reference mentioning the CJEU’s ‘BestWater’ judgment has now been docketed by the CJEU. See further, Case C-160/15, GS Media – Porn! Hyperlinked and Hyperleaked!

Update – 7 October 2015
The GS Media, Svensson and BestWater cases have been mentioned in another ‘hyperlink’ reference that has just been made by a Dutch District Court; see further, Case C-527/15, Stichting Brein – copyright brain-teasers about media players.