Case C-526/15, Uber Belgium – facilitating a mobility service not a taxi service

Do occasional private car drivers who use Uber’s software and get paid to take people on journeys but who do not receive remuneration or a wage, provide a taxi service requiring a license?

Background
TRB is a company in Brussels running a taxi call-centre. That is to say, people wanting a taxi can telephone TRB, who will then contact taxi drivers that are on its books.

Officially, TRB is not actually providing a taxi service and is therefore not subject to Brussels’ taxi laws. Instead, it is the taxi drivers on TRB’s books who are registered, licensed taxi drivers.

A dispute has arisen between the Belgian company TRB on the one hand, and a group of companies related to the Dutch branch of Uber on the other. Basically, TRB objects to Uber providing private car drivers in Brussels with a piece of software that allows them to pick up people and take them on journeys akin to a ‘taxi service’.

TRB takes particular objection to the fact that those drivers do not possess the relevant taxi license and are not subject to the relevant laws for providing a taxi service. This, TRB claims, results in Uber trading contrary to Belgium’s laws of unfair competition both towards taxi call-centres in Belgium, and taxi drivers who are licensed in Brussels.

Uber denies being in competition with TRB, which it sees as abusing a monopoly. Rather, Uber sees itself as an intermediary. Its software facilitates the social sharing of taxi costs among a community of private drivers and private travellers. This community is also policed with the aid of its software because if anything untoward happens, then the software alerts the members of the community of this event. For this, Uber reckons that it does not need taxi permits because, like TRB, it is merely supplying a ‘dispatch service’.

More importantly, Uber claims that a 1995 Brussels Ordinance concerning taxi services and the hiring of vehicles with drivers, does not apply to Uber. This is because the money which a driver receives constitutes neither remuneration nor a wage. Rather, the money is simply compensation that helps private individuals with the costs associated with running their own car, and who chose to do so by sharing their car with others.

This argument perplexed the judge hearing the dispute. While it seemed clear that a driver in receipt of an amount above that which was necessary to cover the costs of a trip would then constitute a remunerated taxi service and thus need a licence, could the same be said for an amount that merely covered the cost of the trip?

If those drivers too would be obliged to obtain a taxi licence, then would that be proportionate and thus compatible with the EU rules on freedom to provide a service?

Question Referred
My unofficial translation of the question asked by the Brussels District Commercial Court reads:
Is the principle of proportionality – enshrined in Articles 5 and 52(1) of the EU Charter, and read together with Articles 15, 16, and 17 of the EU Charter plus Articles 28 and 56 TFEU – to be interpreted as precluding a measure such as that set out in the Brussels Conurbation Ordinance of 27 April 1995 concerning taxi services and the hiring of vehicles with drivers, whereby the concept of “taxi services” would apply equally to unremunerated occasional private carriers who engage in ride-sharing (shared transport) as a result of accepting journey requests that are offered to them via Uber BV et al.’s software application program, namely from companies which are established in another Member State?

Comment
The freedom to conduct a business, enshrined in Article 16 of the EU Charter, is also at stake in a number of other references currently pending before the CJEU: Case C-547/14, Philip Morris Brands – the Second Tobacco Products Directive is invalid; Case C-484/14, McFadden – a mere conduit? and Case C-134/15, Lidl – shelving EU pricing law.

Readers interested in how technology can destroy an old order of labour are referred to another preliminary reference which is also pending before the CJEU and involves Uber; see further, Case C-434/15, Asociación Profesional Élite Taxi – Uber’s new software destroys the old order of labour.

Readers interested in Uber’s software might also want to find a copy of the judgment of the High Court of England and Wales handed down on 16 October 2015 for it discusses whether Uber’s app. constitutes a ‘taximeter’.

Update – 7 November 2015
Yesterday, the BBC website indicated that 100 Uber drivers have lodged proceedings in the English courts in which they claim to be employees rather than self-employed.

Update – 9 June 2016
The Curia website indicates that Uber is involved in a preliminary reference that has recently been made to the CJEU from the TGI Lille. The reference is docketed as Case C-320/16, Uber France.

Update – 16 August 2016
Volume C296 of the EU’s Official Journal indicates that the questions in Case C-320/16, Uber France are:

1. Does Article L.3124-13 of the Code des transports, inserted by Law No 2014-1104 of 1 October 2014 on taxis and private hire vehicles, constitute a new technical regulation that is not implicit and that relates to one or more information society services, within the meaning of Directive 98/34/EC […] such that, pursuant to Article 8 of that directive, it had to be notified in advance to the European Commission, or does it fall within the scope of Directive 2006/123/EC […] on services, Article 2(d) of which excludes transport?

2. In the event that that question is answered in the affirmative, does a failure to satisfy the notification requirement laid down in Article 8 of the directive mean that Article L.3124-133 of the Code des transports is unenforceable against individuals?

On the ‘transport exception’, readers are reminded of the case law mentioned in the earlier Uber preliminary reference from the Spanish courts; see earlier, Case C-434/15, Asociación Profesional Élite Taxi – Uber’s new software destroys the old order of labour.

The ability of a regulatory decision that denies access to a piece of technology but then goes on to affect the supply of services in the internal market, is also at stake in the ‘Lahorgue’ preliminary reference to the CJEU; see further, Case C-99/16, Lahorgue – prevented access to a VPN and impeded in the internal market of legal services.

State-erected technical barriers to the free movement of goods are at stake in Case C-329/16, SNITEM – against state diktats for healthcare software.

Update – 13 September 2016
There has been another preliminary reference to the CJEU about taxis in Brussels. According to the Curia website, the Cour d’appel de Bruxelles in Case C-253/16, Flibtravel has asked:

1.    Must Article 96(1) TFEU be interpreted as being capable of application to rates and conditions imposed by a Member State on taxi service operators where:
(a) the taxi journeys concerned are only exceptionally made across national borders;
(b) a significant proportion of the customers of those taxis consists of EU nationals or residents who are not nationals or residents of the Member State in question; and
(c) in the specific circumstances of the case, the taxi journeys at issue are, for the passenger, very often no more than one stage in a longer trip the final destination or point of departure of which is in an EU country other than the Member State in question?

2.    Must Article 96(1) TFEU be interpreted as being applicable to operating conditions other than fare conditions and the criteria for obtaining authorisation to carry on the transport activity in question, such as, in this case, a prohibition preventing taxi operators from making available individual seats rather than the vehicle in its entirety, and a prohibition on those operators determining themselves the final destination of the journey that they are offering to customers, which has the effect of preventing those operators from grouping together customers who are travelling to the same final destination?

3.    Must Article 96(1) TFEU be interpreted as prohibiting, unless authorised by the Commission, measures such as those referred to in the second question (a) the general aim of which, among other objectives, is to protect taxi operators from competition from private hire vehicle companies and (b) the specific effect of which, in the particular circumstances of the case, is to protect coach service operators from competition from taxi operators?

4.    Must Article 96(1) TFEU be interpreted as prohibiting, unless authorised by the Commission, a measure which prohibits taxi operators from soliciting customers where the effect of that measure in the particular circumstances of the case is to reduce their capacity to attract customers away from a competing coach service?

Comment
Readers of EU Law Radar might recall that protecting taxi drivers from private hire vehicles was at stake in Case C-518/13, Eventech – driving a minicab through the rules governing bus lanes.

Update – 18 December 2016
On 27 October, the Eighth Chamber issued an Order which said that the CJEU lacked jurisdiction to deal with the Belgian Uber case.

The French version of the CJEU’s Order in Case C-526/15, Uber Belgium ECLI:EU:C:2016:830 is reproduced below. The reproduction is not authentic. Only the versions of the document published in the ‘Reports of Cases’ or the ‘Official Journal of the European Union’ are authentic. The source of the reproduction is the Eur-Lex Europa web site. The information on that site is subject to a disclaimer and a copyright notice.

  

ORDONNANCE DE LA COUR (huitième chambre)

27 octobre 2016 ( )

« Renvoi préjudiciel – Article 53, paragraphe 2, du règlement de procédure de la Cour – Irrecevabilité ? Transport de personnes par véhicules automobiles – Conducteurs privés utilisant une application pour téléphone intelligent permettant de les mettre en relation avec des personnes désirant effectuer des trajets urbains – Obligation de disposer d’une autorisation d’exploitation »

Dans l’affaire C‑526/15,

ayant pour objet une demande de décision préjudicielle au titre de l’article 267 TFUE, introduite par le Nederlandstalige rechtbank van koophandel Brussel (tribunal de commerce néerlandophone de Bruxelles, Belgique), par décision du 23 septembre 2015, parvenue à la Cour le 5 octobre 2015, dans la procédure

Uber Belgium BVBA

contre

Taxi Radio Bruxellois NV,

en présence de :

Uber International BV,

Rasier Operations BV,

Uber BV,

Brussels Hoofdstedelijk Gewest,

Belgische Federatie van Taxis,

Nationale Groepering van Ondernemingen met Taxi- en Locatievoertuigen met Chauffeur VZW,

LA COUR (huitième chambre),

composée de M. M. Vilaras, président de chambre, MM. M. Safjan et D. Šváby (rapporteur), juges,

avocat général : M. H. Saugmandsgaard Øe,

greffier : M. A. Calot Escobar,

considérant les observations présentées :

–        pour Uber Belgium BVBA, Uber International BV, Rasier Operations BV et Uber BV, par Mes J. Stuyck, F. Judo et A. Jacobs, advocaten, ainsi que par Mes B. Le Bret et D. Calciu, avocats,

–        pour Taxi Radio Bruxellois NV, par Me E. Maron, avocat, et Me J. Y. Cerckel, advocaat,

–        pour le gouvernement tchèque, par MM. M. Smolek, J. Vláčil et T. Müller, en qualité d’agents,

–        pour le gouvernement espagnol, par M. A. Rubio González, en qualité d’agent,

–        pour le gouvernement français, par MM. G. de Bergues, D. Colas et R. Coesme, en qualité d’agents,

–        pour le gouvernement néerlandais, par Mmes M. Gijzen et M. K. Bulterman, en qualité d’agents,

–        pour le gouvernement polonais, par M. B. Majczyna, en qualité d’agent,

–        pour le gouvernement suédois, par Mmes A. Falk, C. Meyer-Seitz, U. Persson et N. Otte Widgren ainsi que par MM. E. Karlsson et L. Swedenborg, en qualité d’agents,

–        pour la Commission européenne, par MM. F. Wilman et É. Gippini Fournier ainsi que par Mmes J. Hottiaux et H. Tserepa-Lacombe, en qualité d’agents,

vu la décision prise, l’avocat général entendu, de statuer par voie d’ordonnance motivée, conformément à l’article 53, paragraphe 2, du règlement de procédure de la Cour,

rend la présente

Ordonnance

1        La demande de décision préjudicielle porte sur l’interprétation de l’article 5 TUE, des articles 15 à 17 de la charte des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (ci-après la « Charte »), lus en combinaison avec l’article 52, paragraphe 1, de celle-ci, ainsi que des articles 49 et 56 TFUE.

2        Cette demande a été présentée dans le cadre d’un litige opposant Uber Belgium BVBA à Taxi Radio Bruxellois NV dans le cadre d’une action en opposition dirigée contre un jugement faisant droit à une action en cessation introduite au motif, notamment, que, en transmettant des demandes de courses à des chauffeurs qui ne disposent pas d’une autorisation ou, à tout le moins, en participant et/ou en contribuant au renvoi de ces demandes, Uber Belgium agirait en violation des pratiques honnêtes du marché.

 Le cadre juridique

3        L’article 2, paragraphe 1, de l’Ordonnantie betreffende de taxidiensten en de diensten voor het verhuren van voertuigen met chauffeur (ordonnance de la Région de Bruxelles-Capitale relative aux services de taxis et aux services de location de voitures avec chauffeur), du 27 avril 1995 (ci-après l’« ordonnance du 27 avril 1995 »), définit les « services de taxis » comme étant :

« ceux qui assurent, avec chauffeur, le transport rémunéré de personnes par véhicules automobiles et qui réunissent les conditions ci-après :

a)      le véhicule, de type voiture, voiture mixte ou minibus, au sens de l’arrêté royal du 15 mars 1968 portant règlement général sur les conditions techniques auxquelles doivent répondre les véhicules automobiles et leurs remorques, leurs éléments ainsi que les accessoires de sécurité, est, d’après son type de construction et son équipement, apte à transporter au maximum neuf personnes – le chauffeur compris – et est destiné à cet effet ;

b)      le véhicule est mis à la disposition du public, soit à un point de stationnement déterminé sur la voie publique au sens du règlement général sur la police de la circulation routière, soit en tout autre endroit non ouvert à la circulation publique ;

c)      la mise à la disposition porte sur le véhicule et non sur chacune des places lorsque le véhicule est utilisé comme taxi, ou sur chacune des places du véhicule et non sur le véhicule lui-même lorsque le véhicule est utilisé comme taxi collectif avec l’autorisation du Gouvernement de la Région de Bruxelles-Capitale ;

d)      la destination est fixée par le client ».

4        L’article 3 de l’ordonnance du 27 avril 1995 dispose :

« Nul ne peut, sans autorisation du Gouvernement, exploiter un service de taxis au moyen d’un ou de plusieurs véhicules au départ d’une voie publique ou de tout autre endroit non ouvert à la circulation publique, qui se situe sur le territoire de la Région de Bruxelles-Capitale.

[…] »

 Le litige au principal et la question préjudicielle

5        Le 5 mars 2014, Taxi Radio Bruxellois, société jouant le rôle de central téléphonique entre les clients et les taxis qui lui sont affiliés, principalement sur le territoire de la Région de Bruxelles-Capitale (Belgique), a saisi le président du rechtbank van koophandel van Brussel (tribunal de commerce de Bruxelles, Belgique) d’une action en cessation contre Uber Belgium, sur le fondement de la wet betreffende marktpraktijken en consumentenbescherming (loi relative aux pratiques du marché et à la protection du consommateur), du 6 avril 2010, et de la wet met betrekking tot de regeling van bepaalde procedures in het kader van de wet van 6 april 2010 betreffende marktpraktijken en consumentenbescherming (loi concernant le règlement de certaines procédures dans le cadre de la loi du 6 avril 2010 relative aux pratiques du marché et à la protection du consommateur), du 6 avril 2010, devenues les livres VI et XVII du code de droit économique.

6        Par un jugement par défaut du 31 mars 2014, le président de cette juridiction a déclaré la demande de Taxi Radio Bruxellois recevable et fondée.

7        Par une citation signifiée le 24 avril 2014, Uber Belgium a formé opposition contre ce jugement devant le rechtbank van koophandel van Brussel (tribunal de commerce de Bruxelles). Par un jugement du 17 septembre 2014, un changement de langue de procédure a été autorisé et l’affaire a été renvoyée devant le Nederlandstalige rechtbank van koophandel Brussel (tribunal de commerce néerlandophone de Bruxelles, Belgique).

8        Dans ce cadre, Taxi Radio Bruxellois demande à la juridiction de renvoi, notamment :

–        de constater que, en transmettant des demandes de courses à des chauffeurs qui ne disposent pas de l’autorisation visée aux articles 3 et 16 de l’ordonnance du 27 avril 1995 ou, à tout le moins, en participant et/ou en contribuant au renvoi de ces demandes, Uber Belgium, Uber International BV, Rasier Operations BV et Uber BV (ci-après, ensemble, « Uber Belgium e.a. ») agissent en violation des pratiques honnêtes du marché ;

–        d’ordonner à Uber Belgium e.a. de cesser de proposer des courses à des chauffeurs qui ne disposent pas des autorisations visées aux articles 3 et 16 de l’ordonnance du 27 avril 1995 et de cesser de transmettre de telles courses et/ou d’y contribuer d’une quelconque manière ;

–        d’ordonner le retrait de l’accès à l’application « Uber » dans les magasins d’applications Apple Store et Google Play en Belgique, et

–        d’ordonner qu’Uber Belgium e.a. mettent un terme à l’inscription des utilisateurs de ladite application.

9        Au soutien de sa demande, Taxi Radio Bruxellois fait valoir qu’Uber Belgium e.a. commercialisent un service – en l’occurrence « UberPOP » – ou, à tout le moins, participent à la commercialisation de ce service, dans le cadre duquel des courses correspondant à la notion de « services de taxis », au sens de l’article 2, paragraphe 1, de l’ordonnance du 27 avril 1995, sont confiées à des chauffeurs qui ne possèdent pas l’autorisation requise aux articles 3 et 16 de cette ordonnance et qui ne respectent pas les obligations imposées par la réglementation applicable en la matière. Cette situation créerait une distorsion de concurrence au détriment des exploitants et des chauffeurs qui disposent d’une telle autorisation ainsi que des centraux téléphoniques auxquels ils sont affiliés.

10      Uber Belgium e.a. font valoir que l’application « UberPOP » relève d’un concept de l’économie du partage assurant la mise en relation de particuliers, afin de leur permettre de partager les coûts d’une voiture. Ces sociétés soutiennent également qu’elles ne sont que des intermédiaires et qu’elles ne sont donc pas des exploitants de services de taxis.

11      Le Nederlandstalige rechtbank van koophandel Brussel (tribunal de commerce néerlandophone de Bruxelles) constate qu’il lui revient de trancher la question de savoir si les transporteurs qu’Uber Belgium e.a. mettent en contact avec les utilisateurs doivent disposer de l’autorisation imposée par les dispositions combinées de l’article 3 et de l’article 2, paragraphe 1, de l’ordonnance du 27 avril 1995. À cet effet, il devrait vérifier, notamment, si ces transporteurs fournissent un « service de taxis » et cela de façon « rémunérée ».

12      À cet égard, cette juridiction relève que la notion de « services de taxi », au sens de l’article 2, paragraphe 1, de l’ordonnance du 27 avril 1995, n’est pas définie en fonction de la qualité du chauffeur qui effectue la course et qu’elle n’exclut donc pas les particuliers.

13      S’agissant de l’exigence du caractère rémunéré du service de transport, ladite juridiction constate que les chauffeurs intervenant par l’intermédiaire de l’application « Uber » peuvent être indemnisés de deux manières soit à concurrence de leur frais, soit par une indemnisation plus élevée que les frais réellement exposés pour la course.

14      S’agissant de cette dernière hypothèse, la juridiction de renvoi estime qu’un transport effectué dans ces conditions constitue un transport rémunéré. Elle en conclut que, « en transmettant des demandes de courses rémunérées sur le territoire de la Région de Bruxelles-Capitale à des chauffeurs qui ne disposent pas de l’autorisation visée à l’article 3 de l’ordonnance du 27 avril 1995, Uber BV, Uber International BV et Rasier Operations BV (ci-après, ensemble, “Uber BV e.a.”) agissent en violation des pratiques honnêtes du marché, au sens de l’article VI.104 du code de droit économique », et décide d’ordonner à Uber BV de cesser cette pratique sous peine d’astreinte.

15      S’agissant, en revanche, des courses effectuées par des particuliers indemnisés à la seule hauteur des frais réellement exposés, le Nederlandstalige rechtbank van koophandel Brussel (tribunal de commerce néerlandophone de Bruxelles) estime qu’une appréciation différente s’impose. À leur égard, il s’interroge sur le point de savoir si l’ordonnance du 27 avril 1995, interprétée en ce sens qu’elle impose à ces transporteurs une obligation de détenir une autorisation, est compatible avec les libertés garanties aux articles 15, 16 et à l’article 17, paragraphe 1, de la Charte et aux articles 49 et 56 TFUE.

16      Dans ces conditions, le Nederlandstalige rechtbank van koophandel Brussel (tribunal de commerce néerlandophone de Bruxelles) a décidé de surseoir à statuer et de poser à la Cour la question préjudicielle suivante :

« Le principe de proportionnalité, consacré à l’article 5 TUE et à l’article 52, paragraphe 1, de la Charte, lu en combinaison avec les articles 15 [à] 17 de la Charte et les articles [49] et 56 TFUE, doit-il être interprété en ce sens qu’il s’oppose à une réglementation telle que celle prévue par l’[ordonnance du 27 avril 1995], comprise en ce sens que la notion de “services de taxis” s’applique également aux transporteurs particuliers non rémunérés pratiquant le covoiturage en donnant suite à des demandes de courses qui leur sont proposées au moyen d’une application logicielle des entreprises Uber BV e.a., établies dans un autre État membre ? »

 Sur la question préjudicielle

17      En vertu de l’article 53, paragraphe 2, du règlement de procédure de la Cour, lorsque celle-ci est manifestement incompétente pour connaître d’une affaire ou lorsqu’une demande ou une requête est manifestement irrecevable, la Cour, l’avocat général entendu, peut à tout moment décider de statuer par voie d’ordonnance motivée, sans poursuivre la procédure.

18      Il y a lieu de faire application de cette disposition dans la présente affaire.

19      Selon une jurisprudence constante de la Cour, la procédure instituée à l’article 267 TFUE est un instrument de coopération entre la Cour et les juridictions nationales grâce auquel la première fournit aux secondes les éléments d’interprétation du droit de l’Union qui leur sont nécessaires pour la solution du litige qu’elles sont appelées à trancher (ordonnance du 12 mai 2016, Security Service e.a., C‑692/15 à C‑694/15, EU:C:2016:344, point 17 ainsi que jurisprudence citée). En ce sens, la justification du renvoi préjudiciel est non pas la formulation d’opinions consultatives sur des questions générales ou hypothétiques, mais le besoin inhérent à la solution effective d’un contentieux (ordonnance du 3 mars 2016, Euro Bank, C‑537/15, non publiée, EU:C:2016:143, point 33 et jurisprudence citée).

20      Les exigences concernant le contenu d’une demande de décision préjudicielle figurent de manière explicite à l’article 94 du règlement de procédure, dont la juridiction de renvoi est censée, dans le cadre de la coopération instaurée à l’article 267 TFUE, avoir connaissance et qu’elle est tenue de respecter scrupuleusement (ordonnance du 12 mai 2016, Security Service e.a., C‑692/15 à C‑694/15, EU:C:2016:344, point 18 ainsi que jurisprudence citée).

21      La Cour a relevé à maintes reprises que la nécessité de parvenir à une interprétation du droit de l’Union qui soit utile pour la juridiction nationale exige que celle-ci définisse le cadre factuel et réglementaire dans lequel s’insèrent les questions qu’elle pose ou que, à tout le moins, elle explique les hypothèses factuelles sur lesquelles ces questions sont fondées (ordonnance du 12 mai 2016, Security Service e.a., C‑692/15 à C‑694/15, EU:C:2016:344, point 19 ainsi que jurisprudence citée).

22      La juridiction de renvoi doit également indiquer les raisons précises qui l’ont conduite à s’interroger sur l’interprétation de certaines dispositions du droit de l’Union et à estimer nécessaire de poser des questions préjudicielles à la Cour. Celle-ci a déjà jugé qu’il est indispensable que la juridiction nationale donne un minimum d’explications sur les raisons du choix des dispositions du droit de l’Union dont elle demande l’interprétation ainsi que sur le lien qu’elle établit entre ces dispositions et la législation nationale applicable au litige qui lui est soumis (ordonnance du 12 mai 2016, Security Service e.a., C‑692/15 à C‑694/15, EU:C:2016:344, point 20 ainsi que jurisprudence citée).

23      Il importe de souligner que les informations fournies et les questions posées dans les décisions de renvoi doivent permettre à la Cour non seulement de donner des réponses utiles, mais également de donner aux gouvernements des États membres ainsi qu’aux autres parties intéressées la possibilité de présenter des observations conformément à l’article 23 du statut de la Cour de justice de l’Union européenne. Il incombe à cette dernière de veiller à ce que cette possibilité soit sauvegardée, compte tenu du fait que, en vertu de ladite disposition, seules les décisions de renvoi sont notifiées aux parties intéressées, accompagnées d’une traduction dans la langue officielle de chaque État membre, à l’exclusion du dossier national éventuellement transmis à la Cour par la juridiction de renvoi (ordonnance du 12 mai 2016, Security Service e.a., C‑692/15 à C‑694/15, EU:C:2016:344, point 21 ainsi que jurisprudence citée).

24      En l’occurrence, la demande de décision préjudicielle ne répond pas à ces exigences.

25      D’une part, il ressort du cadre juridique présenté par la juridiction de renvoi que l’autorisation requise en vertu de l’article 3 de l’ordonnance du 27 avril 1995 et au sujet de laquelle l’interprétation du droit de l’Union est demandée par cette juridiction présuppose, en application de l’article 2, paragraphe 1, de cette ordonnance, que le service fourni le soit contre rémunération. Or, il découle manifestement de la question préjudicielle que tel n’est pas le cas.

26      Dès lors, à défaut d’éléments supplémentaires fournis par la juridiction de renvoi et permettant néanmoins de considérer que l’activité en cause au principal serait effectivement soumise à autorisation, il y a lieu de considérer que la question posée présente un caractère hypothétique.

27      D’autre part, cette question contient une description pour le moins sommaire, si ce n’est contradictoire, du service fourni par la défenderesse au principal et qui justifie la demande de décision préjudicielle.

28      Il ressort, en effet, de la question préjudicielle adressée à la Cour que ce service est qualifié de « covoiturage » (ridesharing dans le texte de cette question), activité définie usuellement comme l’utilisation d’une même voiture particulière par plusieurs personnes effectuant le même trajet, afin d’alléger le trafic routier et de partager les frais de transport, alors même qu’il découle de la décision de renvoi, lue dans son ensemble, que ledit service est décrit comme prenant la forme de courses effectuées par un chauffeur et dont la destination est fixée par le seul passager.

29      Dès lors, à défaut de description plus détaillée de l’activité en cause au principal, s’agissant notamment de la nature et des modalités de fourniture du service concerné, la Cour n’est pas en mesure de cerner celui-ci avec une précision suffisante.

30      Partant, la demande de décision préjudicielle introduite par la juridiction de renvoi ne satisfait pas aux exigences énoncées aux points 20 à 23 de la présente ordonnance, à savoir un niveau de clarté et de précision suffisant pour permettre à la Cour de statuer, tout en s’assurant que la réponse à la question posée est nécessaire pour la solution du litige pendant devant la juridiction de renvoi et que les gouvernements des États membres ainsi que les intéressés non parties à la cause au principal peuvent utilement faire usage de la possibilité de présenter des observations, conformément à l’article 23 du statut de la Cour de justice de l’Union européenne.

31      Il convient cependant de relever que la juridiction de renvoi conserve la faculté de soumettre une nouvelle demande de décision préjudicielle lorsqu’elle sera en mesure de fournir à la Cour l’ensemble des éléments permettant à celle-ci de statuer (ordonnance du 12 mai 2016, Security Service e.a., C‑692/15 à C‑694/15, EU:C:2016:344, point 30 ainsi que jurisprudence citée).

32      Dans ces conditions, il y a lieu de constater que la demande de décision préjudicielle introduite par le Nederlandstalige rechtbank van koophandel Brussel (tribunal de commerce néerlandophone de Bruxelles) est manifestement irrecevable.

 Sur les dépens

33      La procédure revêtant, à l’égard des parties au principal, le caractère d’un incident soulevé devant la juridiction de renvoi, il appartient à celle-ci de statuer sur les dépens. Les frais exposés pour soumettre des observations à la Cour, autres que ceux desdites parties, ne peuvent faire l’objet d’un remboursement.

Par ces motifs, la Cour (huitième chambre) ordonne :

La demande de décision préjudicielle introduite par le Nederlandstalige rechtbank van koophandel Brussel (tribunal de commerce néerlandophone de Bruxelles, Belgique), par décision du 23 septembre 2015, est manifestement irrecevable.

Signatures


Langue de procédure : le néerlandais.